Help with blazon

Heraldry in the United States
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Chas Charles-Dunne
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Chas Charles-Dunne » 01 May 2015, 13:08

Torsten Laneryd wrote:
Chas Charles-Dunne wrote:I have always referred to it as Ashengrau.

Yes that must be clearer to those who are in doubt what colour ashes are.


I seem to remember that there were other greys, Torsten. There was an Eisengrau and something that was very close to black.
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Torsten Laneryd
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Torsten Laneryd » 01 May 2015, 13:43

This is confusing because Eisenfarbe is Sky Blue. Ok I can think of grey skyes. :)

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Nicholas Hutchinson
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Nicholas Hutchinson » 01 May 2015, 15:44

I was given the arms by a friend who had said that it was an assumed bearing. When he explained what the wheel/cog/thing was he had mentioned it was intended to be stone. Hence the different tincture from the argent. I am working on a more "proper" version and thought everyone's insight may help.
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Chris Green
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Chris Green » 01 May 2015, 16:00

Nicholas Hutchinson wrote:I was given the arms by a friend who had said that it was an assumed bearing. When he explained what the wheel/cog/thing was he had mentioned it was intended to be stone. Hence the different tincture from the argent. I am working on a more "proper" version and thought everyone's insight may help.


If the wheel was intended to be a mill-stone, the central part is correct (though it could have a mill-rind) but the rest is quite wrong. One could I suppose blazon a mill-stone "proper" in which case it might be depicted grayish, but this begs the question as to whether one wants a grayish charge at all. Mill-stones can be found in various tinctures, with or without mill-rinds.



You should consider availing yourself of our design assistance service:

http://fs8.formsite.com/secretary/design-request/index.html
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JMcMillan
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby JMcMillan » 01 May 2015, 17:38

Here's an example of half of a mill-wheel in a coat of arms:

Image

I offer this to underline Chris's point that what is shown in the original image is not a mill-stone, as seems to be intended. It could be a mill-wheel, the thing, usually made of wood, that is pushed by the water to drive an axle that then turns the mill-stone. A millstone would be simply a large disk with a square hole in the center. Either of these, or the mill-rind mentioned by Chris, could be an appropriate symbolism of the trade of a miller or of a person named Miller (or Muller, Meunier, Molinero, Molinari, and so on).

(Personal note: The arms are those of the Mohler family of Diegten, Basel-Land Canton, Switzerland, and therefore canting, as Mohler means miller. I found them because they belong to my 3xgreat-grandmother's family, although they weren't assumed by her very very distant cousins until 1964, nearly 300 years after her 3xgreat-grandfather left Diegten.)
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Chris Green
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Chris Green » 01 May 2015, 17:58

If, as Nicholas' friend said the wheel was intended to be stone it couldn't be a water-wheel. There could however have been some confusion between the wooden mill-wheel (that could be illustrated with pieces around the edge to catch the water - as in the Mohler arms) and the wheel-shaped mill-stone which was turned by the water power of the mill-wheel via a system of cogs.

Nicholas: You need to decide which charge you mean. The broken wheel was usually intended to be a Catherine wheel and was a symbol for martyrdom or the triumph of faith over evil. But it has also been used in a more literal sense by army maintenance units!
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Torsten Laneryd
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Torsten Laneryd » 01 May 2015, 18:21

http://riksarkivet.se/Media/Bilder/hera ... ker144.jpg

Here is a millstone in a Swedish official CoA.

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Torsten Laneryd
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Torsten Laneryd » 01 May 2015, 19:41

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Ton de Witte
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Re: Help with blazon

Postby Ton de Witte » 02 May 2015, 17:46

Torsten Laneryd wrote:
Ton de Witte wrote: Grey is a sort of stain in German heraldry names Asgrau if I remember corectly.
I think they call it Aschfarbe and is unusual and seen nonheraldic. Only the families Aschau in Bayern and Osterhausen in Thueringen are known in Lexikon der Heraldik by Gert Oswald.


Thanks Torsten I was to lazy to consult to look into the Lexikon ;)
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