Helmet

Is it legal? Does it matter? Discuss it here.
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Tomasz Steifer
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Re: Helmet

Postby Tomasz Steifer » 25 Nov 2012, 15:31

Edward Hillenbrand wrote:Or a motorcycle helmet for Harley-Davidson?


and yet interesting helmets, appearing most recently in the Russian heraldry - do not refer to Western European knights helmet, but the shape of the old russian (or old slavic) helmet (shlom, Шишак), here in the beautiful execution of Michael Y. Medvedev
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And here are Polish coat of arms, with the ennoblement of 1556, with the Polish hussar helmet
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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:POL_COA_Bieli%C5%84ski.png
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Tomasz Steifer
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Re: Helmet

Postby Tomasz Steifer » 25 Nov 2012, 15:56

by a system error my post appeared twice :)
Last edited by Tomasz Steifer on 26 Nov 2012, 17:40, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Helmet

Postby Tomasz Steifer » 25 Nov 2012, 16:04

Edward Hillenbrand wrote:Or a motorcycle helmet for Harley-Davidson? What say you?


Once I began to do in the coat of arms in steam punk-style and in motorcycle-style. Unfortunately, after I lost my enthusiasm, and I not finished this work :( Somehow it did look
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Ton de Witte
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Re: Helmet

Postby Ton de Witte » 25 Nov 2012, 18:35

I forgot I painted a coa with an Ottoman Turkish helmet so here it is complete with mantling and crest.

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Jeremy Kudlick
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Re: Helmet

Postby Jeremy Kudlick » 25 Nov 2012, 19:21

steven harris wrote:Two with parka hoods:
Maksagak (1996): http://archive.gg.ca/heraldry/pub-reg/p ... jectID=622
Irniq (2001): http://archive.gg.ca/heraldry/pub-reg/p ... jectID=233

One with a native headdress (apologies if that term is incorrect):
Bartleman (2002): http://archive.gg.ca/heraldry/pub-reg/p ... ojectID=41
Thank you for the links. I knew Irniq had used a parka, but I was not aware Maksagak had, nor that Bartleman used a headdress.

Maksagak was Commissioner of the Northwest Territories when the arms were granted, then later became the 1st Commissioner of Nunavut. Irniq succeeded her as Commissioner of Nunavut, and both are of Inuit descent. I'm not sure whether Irniq's successor or the current Commissioner of Nunavut use a parka as the helm. Lieutenant Governor Bartleman chose the headdress rather than a steel helm as a display of his Mnjikaning heritage.
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Tomasz Steifer
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Re: Helmet

Postby Tomasz Steifer » 25 Nov 2012, 19:38

Ton de Witte wrote:I forgot I painted a coa with an Ottoman Turkish helmet so here it is complete with mantling and crest.


And the same arms (herald Mitya Ivanov) painted by Michael Shelkovenko:
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Peter Harling
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Re: Helmet

Postby Peter Harling » 25 Nov 2012, 20:16

It would certainly be an anchoritism for an UK armiger to sport a motor cycle helmet above his shield! But that said I think a Cromwellian lobster pot or an archers skull cap would, or could, relate to an ancestor who was known to have worn one of these. However, presumably the College of Arms uses the tournament helmet because they were indeed worn with a crest on top and it could be said there is a precedent here; even though crests are now granted that could never have sat upon a helmet.

As has been stated, if no authority exists then anything goes! But surely we need not 'modernise' the armorial helmet with a motor cycle helmet, LOL. Would we not loose the traditional value of a coat of arms!!??

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Last edited by Peter Harling on 27 Nov 2012, 20:33, edited 1 time in total.
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Chas Charles-Dunne
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Re: Helmet

Postby Chas Charles-Dunne » 26 Nov 2012, 13:12

I have been trying to track this down for a few days.

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CONGREGATION SHAAR HASHOMAYIM
Montreal, Quebec
Grant of Arms, Flag and Badge
September 25, 1995
Vol. III, p. 45

Blazon
Arms
Azure between two menorot a representation of the Holy Ark Or charged on the tympanum with a flame issuant from a vessel Gules the ark ensigned by a closed crown topped with a magen David also Or.
Crest
Between two eagle wings displayed Argent highlighted Sable rising from a circlet of roses Gules seeded Or alternating with lily flowers Argent and maple leaves Gules veined Or an open Torah scroll each roll tipped with a magen David Or.

Symbolism
Arms
Blue is considered an ancient and important colour in Judaism. The Holy Ark refers to the Gates of Heaven and the Congregation’s historic name and purpose. The menorah represents learning and assembly in Judaism. The menorah and the Ark, also symbolizing prayer, suggest the ancient threefold purpose of each synagogue. The crown surmounted by a Star of David refers to the majesty of God and the gold is a reference to the riches of heaven and earth.
Crest
The floral crown honours Canada with the maple leaf, Quebec with the lilies, and England with the roses. The rose is also a reference to Montreal, and was found in the first coat of arms created for the city in 1837 by Mayor Benjamin Viger. The Torah symbolizes the Law that forms the basis of Judaism. The helmet decorated with the pomegranate and cornucopia commemorates a battle between the Maccabeans and the Romans that restored the independence of Judea. It recalls the determination and ingenuity of the ancient Jews as they fought for freedom. The white eagle wings outlined in black honour the Polish and German ancestry of Shaar Hashomayim’s founders. Together with the rose, these eagle wings recall the title of the first charter of 1846 incorporating the Congregation Shaar Hashomayim as the earliest Ashkenazi synagogue in Canada. Lastly, the wings refer to the passage into Heaven and are based on the blessing of Isaiah 40:31 which reads, “They that wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount with wings as eagles. They shall run and not be weary. They shall walk and not faint.”
Motto
The sentence is from Genesis 28:17 and means “This is none other than the House of God and this the Gate of Heaven”. This motto underscores the Congregation’s name and repeats the themes of the Arms.
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steven harris
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Re: Helmet

Postby steven harris » 26 Nov 2012, 14:02

Peter Harling wrote:even though crests are now granted that could never have sat upon a helmet.

Among the least practical of crests is that of Vice-Admiral Sir Francis Drake:

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Chas Charles-Dunne
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Re: Helmet

Postby Chas Charles-Dunne » 26 Nov 2012, 14:46

JMcMillan wrote:To clarify a point: while it is true that the English College of Arms will not grant personal arms without a helm and crest, there is absolutely no requirement that an English armiger display the helm in every achievement.

The following are not personal arms, but I wonder when this ruling about personal arms having to be granted with helm and crest was made seeing as late as 1982, a county received a grant without.

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The Arms of Norfolk County Council

The Arms were granted on 3 July 1904 following a Royal Licence of King Edward VII dated 11 May of that year. The King, in the Royal Licence, specifically instructs on the design of the arms to be granted “in commemoration of our long residence in Norfolk”. This of course refers to Sandringham.

The arms are blazoned, or described, as follows: “Per pale Or and Sable a bend ermine on a chief Gules a lion passant guardant of the first between two ostrich plumes Argent quilled and each ensigned with a Prince’s coronet thereon the motto “Ich Dien” as borne on the banner of King Edward III”.

The top part of the shield, the chief, shows a lion from the Royal arms of England together with ostrich plumes and coronet referring to the Prince of Wales. This is a very special honour for the County Council. The rest of the shield refers to Ralph de Gael or Guader, Earl of Norfolk from c 1069. These arms were attributed to him later for he could not have borne them in his lifetime as heraldry did not begin until about 1127. The ermine may well refer to Brittany as Ralph was Lord of Gael in that Duchy.

On 22 December, 1982 supporters were granted: “On either side a lion guardant Or that on the sinister dimidiating a herring erect Argent”. The Lion represents Norwich and the lion/herring Great Yarmouth. Supporters are a further honour reflecting the stature of Norfolk County Council.
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