DARs Completed in 2013

This is where the V.P. Heraldic Design will post finished projects.
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Mike_Oettle
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby Mike_Oettle » 05 Mar 2015, 15:00

Ryan, you may see parts of seven bends, but to me it is perfectly clear (despite the counterchanging of the chevron) that there are three wavy bends on a gold field.
While gules and sanguine are at times hard to tell apart, I would argue that there is a greater difference between them than that between fraises and cinquefoils — after all, a fraise is a cinquefoil but, in Fraser coats of arms, the first term is preferred because it cants.
Regards,
Mike
Last edited by Mike_Oettle on 20 Aug 2015, 20:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Michael F. McCartney
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby Michael F. McCartney » 28 May 2015, 20:51

DItto Joe's explanation of the Gaylorite credo (though I don't recall hearing the term "Gaylorite" before -- sounds a bit like a sports beverage :) )

In the context of a new grant / registration / pickaword from some official or semi-official source (Lyon, Garter, CHA, CHA, wannabe Cronista etc.) where the document is an official record, just as with privately commissioned artwork or calligraphy, there would seem to be a certain sense of caveat petitioner, or maybe "no returns or refunds after you leave the store." The petioner is practically, whether or not legally, obligated to carefully examine both the draft and final blazon and emblazonment, and any personal or family info in the text, to be sure they are correct; and resolve any discrepencies before, or as soon as possible after, the ink and paint dry. Otherwise one may be deemed to have accepted the product "as is" even if that results in future confusion and petitioner's remorse.

So much easier in a free assumption system! - well, still the same practical obligation with a private commission or registry, but at least not legally binding on one's progeny.
Michael F. McCartney
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Ryan Shuflin
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby Ryan Shuflin » 20 Aug 2015, 13:13

Stains must be treated specially. Personally, I believe they should have been treated like abatements and ignored. However they are here. I think it must be said changing gules to sanguine, would count as a difference. That is if two brothers decided to arms one gules, the other sanguine, they would be confused.

As far as blazon vs. emblazonment. The preference given to the blazon, really only applies to cases where an authoritative copy of both exist. In defence of the Orthodox, blazon usually don't change, but emblazonments are corrupted (blackening of silver etc.) However, it is not a perfect system.

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Michael F. McCartney
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby Michael F. McCartney » 27 Aug 2015, 18:48

Sounds like Sanguine is the new Bleu Celeste ;)
Michael F. McCartney
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Ryan Shuflin
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby Ryan Shuflin » 31 Aug 2015, 10:24

Mike_Oettle wrote:Ryan, you may see parts of seven bends, but to me it is perfectly clear (despite the counterchanging of the chevron) that there are three wavy bends on a gold field.
While gules and sanguine are at times hard to tell apart, I would argue that there is a greater difference between them than that between fraises and cinquefoils — after all, a fraise is a cinquefoil but, in Fraser coats of arms, the first term is preferred because it cants.
Regards,
Mike


Exactly. Fraise and cinquefoil are synonyms. No one ( I hope) would argue that Azure, three cinquefoils Argent is not the Fraser arms.

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GJKS
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby GJKS » 30 May 2016, 02:22

JMcMillan wrote:So even the pros make mistakes.

Quite so! Compare the College of Arms rendition of the Arms of (Past President of the IAAH) Melvyn Jeremiah on his Letters Patent with its blazon.

Just for info, when I am working with a client, I show them a 'paintbox' of colours/tinctures that are of standard use in heraldry. Each of those tinctures has a RGB and HEX value, thus red (Gules) [arterial blood] is R-255, G-0, B-0 or #FF0000 whilst Sanguine [veinous blood] is shown as R-170, G-0, B-0 or #AF0000. Then, of course, there is Murrey R-140, G-0, B-75 or #8C004B. Some clients definitely prefer the darker red of Sanguine than the use of pure red Gules.
Regards,
Geoff

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GJKS
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Re: DARs Completed in 2013

Postby GJKS » 30 May 2016, 02:35

Mike_Oettle wrote:Chris, since you mention the flag of Scotland, the dark blue (navy blue) that is so familiar was adopted by the Royal Navy during the 19th century (for the Union Jack as well as St Andrew’s cross) on the grounds that, being dark, it would take longer to fade. When the Scottish Parliament came into being it investigated this anomaly and picked on a slightly pale royal blue shade (I forget the specification) that more closely resembled the sky over Scotland in full sunlight.


The Scottish Parliament and Lord Lyon have decreed that the field of the Flag of Scotland is set in concrete as the specific Pantone colour of 300 which equates to R-0, G-108, B-180, or #006CB4.
Regards,
Geoff


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