Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Nordic heraldry (Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden)
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JMcMillan
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby JMcMillan » 23 Jan 2016, 18:38

Chris Green wrote:In Sweden riddare were were classed as nobility (with tax exemptions among other privileges), whereas English knights were never considered noble (and had no tax privileges!).


And of course English knighthoods are not hereditary.
Joseph McMillan
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Chris Green
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby Chris Green » 23 Jan 2016, 19:46

And of course English knighthoods are not hereditary.


So true! A point that had eluded me about the Swedish system is that adelskap (nobility) at all levels was hereditary. Thus a Swedish riddare was more like a baronet than a knight.
Chris Green
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JMcMillan
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby JMcMillan » 23 Jan 2016, 22:32

Chris Green wrote:
So true! A point that had eluded me about the Swedish system is that adelskap (nobility) at all levels was hereditary. Thus a Swedish riddare was more like a baronet than a knight.


Also (correct me if I'm wrong), doesn't (or didn't) Swedish nobility pass from the father to all his children, not just the eldest son?
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Chris Green
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby Chris Green » 24 Jan 2016, 07:12

Also (correct me if I'm wrong), doesn't (or didn't) Swedish nobility pass from the father to all his children, not just the eldest son?


I can only quote Wiki:

Historically all members of a noble family were generally titled. If the family was of the rank of a Count or a Baron, all members received that title as well. However, following the new Instrument of Government from 1809, a change was made more in line with the British system so that, for later nobility, only the head of the family would be part of hold the title (if there is one). There are a few families where these systems overlap such that the vast majority are nobles pre-1809 without title, while the heads of the families have been elevated to count or baron after 1809. The vast majority of noble families are still of the old kind where all members are regarded as nobles.
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Marcus Karlsson
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 24 Jan 2016, 11:50

Chris Green wrote:
Also (correct me if I'm wrong), doesn't (or didn't) Swedish nobility pass from the father to all his children, not just the eldest son?


I can only quote Wiki:

Historically all members of a noble family were generally titled. If the family was of the rank of a Count or a Baron, all members received that title as well. However, following the new Instrument of Government from 1809, a change was made more in line with the British system so that, for later nobility, only the head of the family would be part of hold the title (if there is one). There are a few families where these systems overlap such that the vast majority are nobles pre-1809 without title, while the heads of the families have been elevated to count or baron after 1809. The vast majority of noble families are still of the old kind where all members are regarded as nobles.


Yes these later are the so called §37 Families where only the head of the Family held the title. Before 1809 the succesion of the Noble rank was regulated in the Sköldebrev (Shield Letter given by the Great Seal and signed by the King) which was the instrument of ennoblement and also contained the Armorial Bearings of the new Nobleman.

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JMcMillan
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby JMcMillan » 24 Jan 2016, 13:37

But weren't/aren't the younger sons, etc., still considered untitled nobility? In the British system, the younger sons are legally commoners.
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Marcus Karlsson
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 30 Jan 2016, 11:22

JMcMillan wrote:But weren't/aren't the younger sons, etc., still considered untitled nobility? In the British system, the younger sons are legally commoners.


No they where not considered untitled nobility if enobled according to §37. Then only the Father was considered noble and when he died the eldest son (or male heir). But earlier the whole family was considered noble.

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JesperWasling
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Re: Arms of Noble Families of Sweden

Postby JesperWasling » 02 Apr 2016, 19:03

Chris is right. The children of a nobleman in Sweden were themselves nobility with the same rank from 1626-1809.
Before 1626 it was a bit unclear but even then both sons and daughters were nobility but since there were no ranks among nobility, even though some was knight’s others esquire.

After 1809, only the head of the family (oldest son of the oldest son etc) are nobility with the same rank as their processor. The rest are commoners, even though the House of Nobility don´t like to say that out loud :-)

And why not simply visit https://www.adelsvapen.com/
There you can follow the family lines of the noble families until mid 19-th centurt.
Regards
Jesper Wasling
Borås, Sweden


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