Barbelé

Heraldry in Canada.
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Martin Goldstraw
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Re: Barbelé

Postby Martin Goldstraw » 25 Jun 2018, 16:18

Chris Green wrote:Not sure how I came to be described as a "free trader" Martin.


Well you're using arrows and the Canadians obviously believe that arrow heads shooting both ways represent free trade!!

Chris Green wrote:PS: How do you upload the picture? I have forgotten how.


Once you have the reply box open to type your reply/post, at the bottom you will see two tabs "Options" and "Attachment". Click "Attachments"; click "Add files" follow the instructions to add your file(s) then, ENSURING that your curser is placed in the reply box where you wish the image to appear click "place inline". You can do this for multiple images however, if the files are too large they will not be accepted. As a rule of thumb, I try not to make my files wider than 500 pixels (and jpegs are best).
Martin Goldstraw
Cheshire Heraldry
http://cheshire-heraldry.org.uk

Iain Boyd
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Re: Barbelé

Postby Iain Boyd » 26 Jun 2018, 00:14

Chris Green wrote:
Perhaps the arrowheads pointing in two directions are supposed to suggest two-way trade.


The oblong bases to the arrows could be crates and the arrows themselves the direction they are being moved?

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Martin Goldstraw
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Re: Barbelé

Postby Martin Goldstraw » 26 Jun 2018, 11:23

In terms of logo design, I am impressed by how the designers of the FedEx logo used the formation of the letters to create an arrow between the E and the X. Excellent design.

emblem-FedEx.jpg
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Martin Goldstraw
Cheshire Heraldry
http://cheshire-heraldry.org.uk

Ryan Shuflin
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Re: Barbelé

Postby Ryan Shuflin » 26 Jun 2018, 19:47

Martin Goldstraw wrote:
The arrowhead division line, used here for the first time in Canadian heraldry, refers to the idea of free trade implicit in the Municipality’s name.

Is this supposed to be punning? Arrowhead = free trade ???
Arrowhead = Hunting yes,
Arrowhead = Fighting and Killing yes,

Arrowhead = Free Trade .... Nope ... sorry, lost on me.

Here is an image of two free traders I found on the web.

chris-green.JPG


Tongue in cheek credit to the artist Matthew Ryan and the free trader Chris Green.


Reciprocity reminds me of Clear and Present Danger, the only trade that involved was the drug trade, but there was a lot of fighting and killing.

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JMcMillan
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Re: Barbelé

Postby JMcMillan » 27 Jun 2018, 14:43

Arrows seem to me to be a sufficiently familiar symbol for movement that (with the explanation of the symbolism) it was apparent that these are not intended to be actual physical arrows but representations of two-way movement.

Of course, I then thought, maybe this is just a North American thing, but no.

Image
Joseph McMillan
Alexandra, Virginia, USA

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Martin Goldstraw
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Re: Barbelé

Postby Martin Goldstraw » 27 Jun 2018, 20:33

JMcMillan wrote:Arrows seem to me to be a sufficiently familiar symbol for movement that (with the explanation of the symbolism) it was apparent that these are not intended to be actual physical arrows but representations of two-way movement.

Of course, I then thought, maybe this is just a North American thing, but no.

Image


Good Grief!!
Martin Goldstraw
Cheshire Heraldry
http://cheshire-heraldry.org.uk

Iain Boyd
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Location: New Zealand

Re: Barbelé

Postby Iain Boyd » 27 Jun 2018, 23:22

Martin Goldstraw wrote:Good Grief!!


Ditto that, Martin!

Where is this confusing roundabout?

To bring this post back on topic -

a 'barb' is defined as "A sharp projection near the end of an arrow, fish hook, or similar object, which is angled away from the main point so as to make extraction difficult.".

Consequently, 'barbele' is (perhaps) reasonable, but, not in my opinion, ideal! The term would be better used in another situation - whatever that might be.

Regards,

Iain Boyd


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