U.S. Navy Heraldry

Heraldry of the armies, navies and airforces of the world
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Chris Green
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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Chris Green » 11 Jul 2014, 13:00

It should be noted that all wasps are not yellow/black. There are all black wasps (though whether they exist in New Zealand I couldn't say!).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphex_pensylvanicus
Chris Green
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JMcMillan
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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby JMcMillan » 11 Jul 2014, 21:37

Chris Green wrote:It should be noted that all wasps are not yellow/black. There are all black wasps (though whether they exist in New Zealand I couldn't say!).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphex_pensylvanicus


And as the most common species of Wasp in eastern North America, probably the one the Continental Navy had in mind when it named he first Wasp in 1775. This, along with Hornet (the first of which was Wasp's consort as the first two Continental ships to put to sea), is one of the most distinguished ship names in USN history. The U.S. Marines' first amphibious assault (New Providence, Bahamas, 1776) was conducted from Wasp I. Wasp II (16 guns) took HMS Frolic (22) in October 1812. Wasp V (22 guns) sank or captured 14 British merchantmen plus HMS Reindeer (21) in a five-month cruise in 1814. In 1942, the aircraft carrier Wasp VIII twice ferried RAF Spitfires to the relief of Malta, then rendered distinguished service in the Pacific in the Guadalcanal campaign before being sunk by a Japanese submarine. Wasp IX, another carrier, won eight campaign stars (battle honors, in British terminology) for service in the Pacific. This is the one whose patch I posted earlier in the thread.

All of this history by way of preface to a lament that the USN and TIOH between them can't find a way to better preserve historic unit identity in the design of ships' arms rather than introducing totally different concepts every time a new ship with a historic name is commissioned. Why not "Or a wasp volant Sable, a base wavy (or wavy crested) Azure" to refer retroactively to Wasp IX, and the same within a bordure Gules for Wasp X (the red referring to the USMC in light of the present ship's amphibious role), and the same again within a bordure of another color for whatever ship may bear the name in the future?
Joseph McMillan
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Marcus Karlsson
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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 05 Dec 2015, 10:13

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US Navy Office of Information, Picture from Wikimedia Commons.

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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 05 Dec 2015, 10:20

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Also from Wikimedia USS John S. McCain (DDG 56).

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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 05 Dec 2015, 10:21

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USS Normandy, CG 60.

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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 05 Dec 2015, 10:26

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USS Bataan LHD 5. The Bamboo Spears and the Red Pale denote the Bataan Death March during World War II.

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Torsten Laneryd
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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Torsten Laneryd » 05 Dec 2015, 23:23

I am most interested in meanings of blazons. This is a badge that tells the story of a famous historical event:


U.S. Navy USS Normandy (CG 60), cruiser emblem (crest)
SHIELD: The lettering, lion, anchor, and perimeter of the shield are gold. The border beneath the lettering and the crest background are dark blue. These are the color traditionally associated with the Navy. The caltraps symbolize mines and German defenses on the Normandy beaches. The anchor characterizes sea power and strength. The chevron is broken and thrust forward, denoting the assault landing and the "breaking through" the enemy defenses; it is white for honor and integrity, edged with red for valor, sacrifice, and bloodshed.

CREST: The pole star signifies the Allied Forces that joined for the Normandy Invasion. It also portrays the four points of the globe, signifying the worldwide mission of the NORMANDY. The gold lion, adopted from the Coat of Arms of Normandy, France, represents the location of the assault and characterizes the courage, strength, and determination of the invasion forces. He grasps an inflamed trident in honor of Neptune, mythological lord of the sea, and code name for the Navy's crucial gunfire support and the delivery of land forces in the Battle of Normandy.

MOTTO: The words, "VANGUARD OF VICTORY," underscore the Battle of Normandy as the spearhead of the Allied defense which turned the tide of war in Europe, as well as the leading role of the AEGIS cruiser in today's world as a defender of world freedom.

/ USN
From milbadges.com

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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 08 Dec 2015, 19:27

The Arms of the USS John S. McCain symbolises the naval heritage of the McCain Family (the Officers' Swords). The Oriental Dragon symbolises the particpation in the Pacific Campaign suring World War II. The Trident symbolises the powerful waeaponry of the Ship and the AEGIS-system. The Eagle holding a broken chain denotes the breaking of Tryanny during US Forces in World War II. The Palm symbolises Victory.

Iain Boyd
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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Iain Boyd » 10 Dec 2015, 07:00

Re the badge of USS Bataan -

It is a pity that the seahorse is 'overall'. The arms would have looked so much better if it was a charge on the pale as is the oriental dragon in the badge of USS John S McCain.

Iain Boyd

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Re: U.S. Navy Heraldry

Postby Marcus Karlsson » 12 Aug 2017, 10:41

I agree Iain Boyd the Seahorse of USS Bataan would look better if placed on the Pale.

The Arms of USS Rafael Peralta DDG-115 one of the newest Arleigh Burke Class Destoyers. Perhaps not that good heraldry.

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