Some German heraldry

Heraldry of the German speaking countries
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Arthur Radburn
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Some German heraldry

Postby Arthur Radburn » 14 Jun 2018, 18:45

It's been a while since we discussed German heraldry on our forum. Here are a few examples of modern arms, as registered with the 'eHerold' private registry. I've chosen them because they feature partitions of the field or other elements which we don't usually encounter in the 'Anglo' tradition.

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Raimund Classen. He is/was in the roofing business, which no doubt explains the chief of red beavertail tiles.

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Manfred Fiebritz.

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Walter Mauthe.

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Georg Preuss. The partition line is called "Lindenblattschnitt", a Lindenblatt being a linden-leaf.

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Gerhard Schinhammer. He has a canting "Hammerschnitt" to decorate the partition line.

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Rudolf Widmann. The "drinking glass silhouettes" no doubt refer to the fact that Herr Widmann is/was a Gastwirt (hotelier or innkeeper).
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Arthur Radburn
IAAH Vice-President : Heraldic Education

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Michael F. McCartney
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Re: Some German heraldry

Postby Michael F. McCartney » 15 Jun 2018, 04:19

Fascinating! Some would be challenging to blazon in English, but well worth the effort.
Michael F. McCartney
Fremont, California

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Ton de Witte
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Re: Some German heraldry

Postby Ton de Witte » 17 Jun 2018, 10:42

very nice designs
Ton de Witte
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Arthur Radburn
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Re: Some German heraldry

Postby Arthur Radburn » 17 Jun 2018, 14:41

Michael F. McCartney wrote:Fascinating! Some would be challenging to blazon in English, but well worth the effort.
Yes, some of the blazons are very long, as they describe the partitions in detail. Others simply use words like "Lindenblattschnitt" and 'Hammerschnitt", which suggests that these are well-established lines.

There are several noticeable differences between the German and English styles of blazon. In the English tradition, for instance, a chief or a bordure is placed last, whereas in the German style it is placed first. So the Classen blazon begins with "Beneath a beavertail roof-tiled chief Gules". A blazon for arms with a bordure begins "Within a bordure ..."
Regards
Arthur Radburn
IAAH Vice-President : Heraldic Education


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