One colour, two metals

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Arthur Radburn
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One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 16 Feb 2019, 15:29

"Less is more". Some very attractive coats of arms can be designed using a minimal palette, e.g. one colour plus both metals.
Here are examples from four countries.

Image
Australia : Damian M. Benson (Chief Herald of Ireland grant, 2005).

Image
Belgium : Pieter P. Jaspaert (Flemish Heraldry Council grant, 2018).

Image
Canada : Gerald A. McKinnon (Canadian Heraldic Authority grant, 2014).

Image
South Africa : Jeppe Boys' High School (Bureau of Heraldry registration, 1989 (based on a design dating from 1906).

Any thoughts about these designs?
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Arthur Radburn
IAAH Vice-President : Heraldic Education

Iain Boyd
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Iain Boyd » 16 Feb 2019, 20:58

I particularly like the Irish grant to Damian Benson, but, do not like the Canadian grant to Gerald McKinnon.

I am not sure about the arms of Jeppe Boy's High School - I would have preferred a chief instead of a fesse.

How about 'two colours, one metal', Arthur?

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Iain

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Arthur Radburn
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 17 Feb 2019, 12:43

Iain Boyd wrote:I particularly like the Irish grant to Damian Benson, but, do not like the Canadian grant to Gerald McKinnon.
My thoughts too. Benson's helmet is intriguing. In England and Scotland, this pattern would be for a knight or baronet. I wonder what CHI's reasoning was.

I am not sure about the arms of Jeppe Boy's High School - I would have preferred a chief instead of a fesse.
The design evidently refers to the school's location in Johannesburg, which is built on a gold reef on the Witwatersrand (which means "white waters ridge").

How about 'two colours, one metal', Arthur?
Thanks for the topic suggestion, Iain.
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Arthur Radburn
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Arthur Radburn
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 17 Feb 2019, 13:42

Another example, which is reasonably topical : the arms of the Brooksbank baronets :

Brooksbank.png

A member of the family, Jack Brooksbank, married Princess Eugenie of York last year.
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Arthur Radburn
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James Drabble
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby James Drabble » 17 Feb 2019, 17:30

Arthur Radburn wrote:
Iain Boyd wrote:I particularly like the Irish grant to Damian Benson, but, do not like the Canadian grant to Gerald McKinnon.
My thoughts too. Benson's helmet is intriguing. In England and Scotland, this pattern would be for a knight or baronet. I wonder what CHI's reasoning was.


I would imagine that this is because he is a knight in the Australian Association of the Order of Malta. See p. 32 here,

https://issuu.com/australianhospitaller/docs/2017_hospitaller_-_web_edition

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Arthur Radburn
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 17 Feb 2019, 20:22

James Drabble wrote:I would imagine that this is because he is a knight in the Australian Association of the Order of Malta.

Very likely. It would also explain what appears to be the badge of the order on the helmet. Thanks for the reference to the magazine.
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Arthur Radburn
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JMcMillan
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby JMcMillan » 18 Feb 2019, 13:53

What's the source of the Benson emblazonment? The CHI record copy on the National Library of Ireland website shows only shield and crest and the text doesn't mention the knighthood. Could it be a privately commissioned emblazonment? Although there is a watermark.
Joseph McMillan
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Arthur Radburn
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 18 Feb 2019, 13:59

JMcMillan wrote:What's the source of the Benson emblazonment? The CHI record copy on the National Library of Ireland website shows only shield and crest and the text doesn't mention the knighthood. Could it be a privately commissioned emblazonment? Although there is a watermark.

The source is an image of the Letters Patent, which was on the old CHI website a few years ago.
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Arthur Radburn
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Arthur Radburn
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Arthur Radburn » 20 Jun 2021, 19:47

I came across this example of "one colour two metals" on the Canadian Heraldic Authority website : the arms of Victor Vilmont, with a "cadet shield" for his son Danil, both granted in 2019.

Vilmont V - CHA 2019.png

Arms : Argent a vol Sable issuant from a cross fretty Or and charged on each wing with three mullets Argent, on a chief Sable a Celtic knot Or.

Crest : A horse salient seated thereon a knight in armour Sable plumed and cloaked Argent holding in the dexter hand a lance Sable flying therefrom a pennant of two points Argent charged with a cross fretty Sable and bearing on the sinister arm an escutcheon Argent charged with a cross Gules, all issuant from a coronet of maple leaves and Maltese crosses Or.

Vilmont D - CHA 2019.png

Danil Vilmont's arms are differenced by substituting a hibiscus flower Or for the cross fretty. This is a temporary difference; he will inherit the undifferenced arms on the death of his father.

The Celtic knot makes an interesting and decorative charge.
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Arthur Radburn
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Iain Boyd
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Re: One colour, two metals

Postby Iain Boyd » 20 Jun 2021, 22:58

Personally, I would describe the charge on the chief of Victor Vilmont's arms as a 'celtic interlacing pattern' rather than a 'celtic knot' although I would tend towards describing it as some sort of 'fretty' figure - especially as it appears to be an expansion of the 'cross fretty' in base.


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