Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

The depictions of coats of arms
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Michael Grace
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Michael Grace » 10 Oct 2012, 00:27

Beautifully rendered Ljubodrag!
Michael

Grasagh aboe

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steven harris
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby steven harris » 10 Oct 2012, 13:14

Please do not misunderstand my mitre-related questions as criticism. The emblazonment is splendid!
Steven A. Harris, Associate Fellow
member since February 2008

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Jesse Carrasco
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Jesse Carrasco » 10 Oct 2012, 20:19

This is wonderful! Ljubodrag does it again.
Have fun,

--j

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Ljubodrag Grujic
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Ljubodrag Grujic » 12 Oct 2012, 13:22

steven harris wrote:Please do not misunderstand my mitre-related questions as criticism. The emblazonment is splendid!


No, I don't. I am very sorry if I sounded like that! I do apologise to you and all. Thank you for your kind words.
Ljubodrag Grujić - Љубодраг Грујић

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GSelvester
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby GSelvester » 14 Oct 2012, 20:03

There are three basic mitres used by Western prelates. The mitra simplex is plain white linen (white damask for cardinals). The mitra aurifigiata is a plain mitre that is gold-colored (so there are such things as gold miters). The mitra preciosa is adorned with decorations or precious gems. Generall speaking, most mitres are made of a white or gold base material and then decorated with materials of various colors.

However, in heraldry there is no "default" color for a mitre. This is especially true because abbots traditionally use a mitra simplex in heraldry and bishops a mitra preciosa.

When a mitre is used as a charge on a shield, or in a crest, or as an external ornament (as in the arms of a diocese) it should be blazoned.

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Ljubodrag Grujic
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Ljubodrag Grujic » 20 Oct 2012, 12:28

Thank you, father Silvester. On the subject of heraldry of the Catholic church yours is the definite word, in my humble opinion.
Ljubodrag Grujić - Љубодраг Грујић

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O. Wrigley-P.-McKerr
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby O. Wrigley-P.-McKerr » 21 Dec 2012, 02:05

I have been told the bend would be better stated as "bordered surmounted of another bend gold (or)".

Does that make sense to anyone?

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Chas Charles-Dunne
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Chas Charles-Dunne » 21 Dec 2012, 12:00

O. Wrigley-P.-McKerr wrote:
Arms: Sable on a bend Murrey fimbriated Or between two elephant tusks proper butt-capped Or both bendwise the dexter tusk butt to chief and the sinister tusk butt to base three bear heads erased Argent.

Crest: On a wreath Argent and Sable an elephant statant affronty wearing a mitre and holding by its trunk three peacock train feathers bendwise sinister proper.

Motto: Semper excelsius.
~~~~~~~~~~
I have been told the bend would be better stated as "bordered surmounted of another bend gold (or)".

Does that make sense to anyone?



Not to me. We all know what a fimbriation is, and your bend is fimbriated. It could be argued that it is a 'a bend Or surmounted by a bend Murry', but not the other way round. As far as I can see, the blazon is correct.

My only quibble is the expression 'butt-capped'. It sounds like a dodgy activity. As in, "What did you do on the week-end?", "Oh, I went butt-capping, with some friends."
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Chas
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Ryan Shuflin
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Ryan Shuflin » 21 Dec 2012, 12:45

Chas Charles-Dunne wrote:
O. Wrigley-P.-McKerr wrote:
Arms: Sable on a bend Murrey fimbriated Or between two elephant tusks proper butt-capped Or both bendwise the dexter tusk butt to chief and the sinister tusk butt to base three bear heads erased Argent.

Crest: On a wreath Argent and Sable an elephant statant affronty wearing a mitre and holding by its trunk three peacock train feathers bendwise sinister proper.

Motto: Semper excelsius.
~~~~~~~~~~
I have been told the bend would be better stated as "bordered surmounted of another bend gold (or)".

Does that make sense to anyone?



Not to me. We all know what a fimbriation is, and your bend is fimbriated. It could be argued that it is a 'a bend Or surmounted by a bend Murry', but not the other way round. As far as I can see, the blazon is correct.

My only quibble is the expression 'butt-capped'. It sounds like a dodgy activity. As in, "What did you do on the week-end?", "Oh, I went butt-capping, with some friends."


perhaps "garnished Or" would be a better choice of words, although it not very specific.

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Chas Charles-Dunne
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Re: Grujić's Rendition of My Achievement

Postby Chas Charles-Dunne » 21 Dec 2012, 13:31

Ryan Shuflin wrote:
Chas Charles-Dunne wrote:
O. Wrigley-P.-McKerr wrote:
Arms: Sable on a bend Murrey fimbriated Or between two elephant tusks proper butt-capped Or both bendwise the dexter tusk butt to chief and the sinister tusk butt to base three bear heads erased Argent.

Crest: On a wreath Argent and Sable an elephant statant affronty wearing a mitre and holding by its trunk three peacock train feathers bendwise sinister proper.

Motto: Semper excelsius.
~~~~~~~~~~
I have been told the bend would be better stated as "bordered surmounted of another bend gold (or)".

Does that make sense to anyone?



Not to me. We all know what a fimbriation is, and your bend is fimbriated. It could be argued that it is a 'a bend Or surmounted by a bend Murry', but not the other way round. As far as I can see, the blazon is correct.

My only quibble is the expression 'butt-capped'. It sounds like a dodgy activity. As in, "What did you do on the week-end?", "Oh, I went butt-capping, with some friends."


perhaps "garnished Or" would be a better choice of words, although it not very specific.


According to J P Brooke-Little in his An Heraldic Alphabet -

Garnished - Used to describe the decoration on charges such as pieces of armour, bugles, horns etc., when of a different tincture from the charge itself.


The bend is fimbriated and that would be the correct and accurate blazon for it. Anything else would not only complicate things unnecessarily and be wrong.
Regards
Chas
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