Forms of address

General heraldry discussion forums covering all nations of the world.
User avatar
Edward Hillenbrand
Posts: 200
Joined: 10 Sep 2012, 01:42
Location: Catskill Mountains, New York, United States

Forms of address

Postby Edward Hillenbrand » 13 Dec 2012, 20:26

I know this is a bit off our general topic but I have a question that maybe a lister can answer: what are the proper forms of address for medieval academics? What would a Ph.D be called? A master's holder etc? I thought it went: Learned Sir for a BA/BS, Well Learned Sir for a MA/MS and Very Well Learned Sir for a Ph.D whoever I can no long find the reference I had on this subject.

Thanx in advance for any help you can give.
Ed Hillenbrand

"Memento te esse Mortalum"

Image
Armorial Register - International Register of Arm

User avatar
steven harris
Posts: 170
Joined: 11 Jul 2012, 12:22
Location: Greendale, Massachusetts

Re: Forms of address

Postby steven harris » 14 Dec 2012, 01:19

Edward Hillenbrand wrote:I know this is a bit off our general topic but I have a question that maybe a lister can answer: what are the proper forms of address for medieval academics? What would a Ph.D be called? A master's holder etc? I thought it went: Learned Sir for a BA/BS, Well Learned Sir for a MA/MS and Very Well Learned Sir for a Ph.D whoever I can no long find the reference I had on this subject.

Thanx in advance for any help you can give.

I've never heard of such a system.

The styles of "Reverend" go (high to low):
The Most Reverend
The Right Reverend
The Very Reverend
The Reverend

Perhaps an analogous system could be attempted with The Learned? I wouldn't include the Sir, per se, unless he'd been knighted, but I can see an argument being made for its use a differential.
Steven A. Harris, Associate Fellow
member since February 2008


Return to “Heraldry”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests